Oak Bay High Biology


Fathom the Deep

Marine invertebrates are animals without backbones that live in the ocean. These creatures make up most of ocean animal life. Learn about the incredible diversity beneath the waves.

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What Has Six Legs?

The study of insects (entomology) is alive and well at the Royal BC Museum. Go behind the scenes to discover how we learn about the diversity of insect life in this province.

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Not So Scary

Many people fear spiders but they are rarely harmful to humans and are important natural predators of insects. The spider collection at the Royal BC Museum strives to reflect the diversity of spiders in this province.

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Something Fishy

The Royal BC Museum fish collection is varied and wonderful. Explore the astounding diversity of British Columbia fishes through the collection and scientific illustration.

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Species at Risk

We're all in this together. An ecosystem is a natural community. When species disappear it can throw an entire system off balance, with far-reaching consequences for ecosytems, for the planet, and for us. What can we do about it?

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Listening for Birds

Listening for birds is a skill that takes patience and perseverance. Grace Bell used her skill and love of birds to record British Columbia bird calls and songs.

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Wolves to Whales

The mammal collection is as diverse as the mammals of BC. Mammal specimens at the museum are preserved, stored and made available for research.

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Outdoor Classroom Area

The outdoor classroom area is a key educational component to the outdoor classroom.  Intended to help foster a connection between the students and the Bowker Creek riparian ecosystem, its tiered seating area allows lessons to be taught outdoors, with students surrounded by the plants and animals being studied. 

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Science 9 Discovery Museum Partnership Project

The focus of the driving question was understanding how reflection on our past choices can guide our future ones.  A point of interest was the return of salmon to Bowker Creek. Prior to its alteration away from its natural state, Bowker Creek was a salmon-bearing stream, a status it still officially maintains today. Can the salmon come back?

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Students Helping to Take Care of the Riparian Zone

Students from the Sc 9 Discovery class helping to spread mulch down to keep reduce the spread of invasive plant species. 

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