Residential Schools and ReconciliationLook


Look closer. Examine images related to this subject. Click an image to enlarge and see captions. How would you describe the picture?

A black and white photograph of two young Aboriginal men playing checkers in their dormitory. There are only two beds in their room. They are dressed in their European-style uniforms.
A black and white photograph of several young Aboriginal girls. They are working in a laundry room, some are ironing while others are washing and drying clothes.
A black and white photo of the younger boys’ dormitory at the Coqualeetza Residential School. There are 14 Aboriginal boys in the image and 15 beds; however, this image only shows a portion of the whole room. The boys, wearing their uniforms, are standing beside the beds.
A black and white photograph of a young Aboriginal boy, Thomas Moore, before he went to the Regina Indian Industrial School. He is in traditional Cree clothing and his hair is in two long braids.
A black and white photograph of a young boy, Thomas Moore, after arriving at the Regina Indian Industrial School in Saskatchewan. He no longer has his long braids, rather a European style haircut, and he is in his school uniform which resembles a European uniform.
A black and white photograph of a female teacher giving a lesson to approximately 20 Aboriginal children. She is holding up a card at the front of the classroom and all the children are also holding up a card.
A black and white photograph of the exterior of the Coqualeetza Residential School. It is a large four-storey building located in a vast clearing.
This is a photograph of a class of young Aboriginal girls. They are located outside and are standing in three lines, with some kneeling on the ground. There are non-Aboriginal teachers standing on either side of the group. All the girls are wearing European-style dresses and have short hair.
A black and white drawing of four coyotes standing upright around a fire. The coyotes are wearing traditional Nlaka’pamux clothing. The coyote on the right of the image is playing a flute-like instrument while the other three coyotes appear to be dancing around the fire while holding hammers.
A black and white drawing of two coyotes. The coyote on the left of the image is sitting on a rug on the floor. The coyote is wrapped in a blanket and wearing a Nlaka’pamux headdress. The coyote on the right of the image appears to be waving goodbye to the other coyote as he begins to climb a ladder. This coyote is also wearing traditional clothing of the Nlaka’pamux.

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